Monitoring Azure SQL Data Warehouse from SSMS

13 Apr

For those of us who lived through the Microsoft lifecycle of bringing to market a scale-out MPP data warehouse offering from DatAllegro to Parallel Data Warehouse (PDW) to Analytics Platform System, the technology behind that offering has evolved tremendously and were all happy to see it elevated to new heights in the cloud as Azure Data Warehouse.

But it’s important to understand the lineage from the perspective of same of the namings of the DMVs that you’ll use in SSMS. And, yes, those of us who had to evolve from the early PDW v1 days using Nexus because SSMS didn’t work with PDW are very excited with new T-SQL compatibility and SSMS compatibility.

Just make sure that when you are using SSMS to monitor your Azure Data Warehouse that you recognize that many of the DMVs from SQL Server land do not work in PDW or ADW and that many of the names of similar DMVS will have PDW in their names. But these will work with ADW.

For example, here is the documentation on monitoring your ADW workloads and grabbing SQL command syntax, similar to using DM EXEC REQUEST in SQL Server, but with PDW DMVs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/sql-data-warehouse/sql-data-warehouse-manage-monitor.

-- Find queries 
-- Replace request_id with value from Step 1.

SELECT waits.session_id,
      waits.request_id,  
      requests.command,
      requests.status,
      requests.start_time,  
      waits.type,
      waits.state,
      waits.object_type,
      waits.object_name
FROM   sys.dm_pdw_waits waits
   JOIN  sys.dm_pdw_exec_requests requests
   ON waits.request_id=requests.request_id
WHERE waits.request_id = 'QID####'
ORDER BY waits.object_name, waits.object_type, waits.state;

So now you know why you have to look for PDW for ADW DMVs!

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Advanced Analytics Going Mainstream in 2017

8 Jan

Well, I finally feel comfortable saying it: Advanced Analytics is going mainstream this year. Even the term “Advanced Analytics” is a recent amalgam of long-time analytical disciplines that includes predictive analytics, descriptive analytics, data mining, machine learning and more. And now we refer to these techniques at Big Data scale as “Deep Learning”.

Here is Microsoft’s Joseph Sirosh talking about “Deep Learning in Every Software“. I would probably state it instead as “Advanced Analytics everywhere”. Not all scenarios require Big Data scale techniques, but most every application can gain an advantage by including cognitive capabilities as a natural aspect of the end-user experience.

Having spent years in the wilderness working on projects that included predicitve, data mining and machine learning, I wondered what are some of the recent technology and business drivers that have led us to the current inflection point in which advanced analytics begins finally breaking through into mainstream applications.

At Pentaho, we struggled for years to break through with machine learning projects using the popular Weka ML platform and retrofitted Weka to Big Data platforms Hadoop & Spark. At Microsoft, we had data mining built into the mainstream SQL Server database product for a long time, but it was a niche capability.

To me, these 5 factors have most impacted the recent turn, which is also the next-step result of US businesses focusing a lot of time, attention and resource on hiring, training and mentoring the Data Science role in their organizations.

  1. Open source projects, tools and libraries eliminated both the high-cost requirements of advanced analytics tools as well as making pre-built, trained and tested models available to non-math PhDs.
  2. R, Python, CRAN, TensorFlow, Cognitive Toolkit. I’ll also throw in my affinity to Weka because it was a trailblazer in the open source ML market and is still taught in many academic classes.
  3. Data quality and governance maturity: Decades of collecting data for business intelligence by the business and IT communities has raised awareness of the need to curate data, meaning that there are more quality data marts available for advanced analytical projects that can mine and optimize those marts.
  4. Artificial intelligence in everyday life: The more comfortable and familiar people become with AI, the more they will come to expect that in business applications as well. Everyday exposure to AI, ie. recommendation engines (Amazon, Netflix), face recognition (Facebook)
  5. Cloud Computing: Without needing to put resources into acquiring, standing-up and maintaining complex analytics architectures on-prem, I can just build machine learning experiments, explore data sets and operationalize learning as web services from my broswer or client tool using Azure Machine Learning, R Studio or Spark/R notebooks from an on-demand Hadoop cluster.

 

 

Azure Big Data Analytics in the Cloud

3 Nov

Hi All … I’m BAAAACK! Now that I’ve settled into my new role in the Microsoft Azure field team as a Data Solution Architect, I’m getting back out on the speaker circuit. Here are my next 2 speaking engagements:

Tampa SQL BI Users Group

Global Big Data Conference Dec 9 Tampa

In each of those, I will be presenting Azure Big Data Analytics in the Cloud with Azure Data Platform overviews, demos and presentations.

I am uploading some of the demo content on my GitHub here

And the presentations on Slideshare here

 

Pentaho Native Analytics on MongoDB

15 Dec

Pentaho has a very rich and complete business analytics product suite. There is ETL, data integration, data orchestration, operational reporting, dashboards, BI developer tools, predictive analytics, OLAP analytics … and I’m probably missing a few others!

So when you are looking to implement a business intelligence and analytics solution for a Big Data platform using a modern technology outside of the traditional RDBMS sphere, like MongoDB NoSQL database, you have the advantage of a complete BI product set that works out-of-the-box to take advantage of that platform’s strengths.

What I mean by that is with Pentaho, there are different tools to optimize each aspect of a complete BI solutions. For instance, Pentaho Data Integration (PDI) has direct hooks into MongoDB using their API directly to manipulate and move data using MongoDB documents. The Pentaho Report Designer (PRD) also uses that same direct access mechanism to provide reporting for your business users directly on MongoDB.

With the Pentaho 5.1 BA Suite Release, interactive OLAP analytics using Pentaho Analyzer was introduced. This is Pentaho’s unique capability to translate business user queries using slice-and-dice MDX mechanisms directly into MongoDB AggPipeline queries.

With these capabilities, Pentaho does not require extracting and staging of MongoDB data from documents in collections into traditional RDBMS tables. Instead, analytics is turned into native MongoDB query syntax on the fly without any SQL requirements. And as I stated above, this allows the user to fully leverage and optimize your Big Data source, in this case MongoDB. Pentaho will push down queries into your MongoDB cluster, thereby not requiring you to establish an entirely separate analytics platform with its own hardware and scalability requirements.

Big Data Analytics Presentation for SQL Saturday Orlando

28 Sep

Thanks to all for joining my session on Big Data Analytics at Seminole State College in Sanford, FL for the SQL Saturday event. I’ve uploaded my slides to SlideShare here. Thanks again!  Best, Mark

Edit Pentaho Mondrian Models Inline in your Browser

23 Jul

Our friends at Ivy Software (http://www.ivy-is.co.uk/ivy-labs/ivy-software/) have updated one my favorite community marketplace tools available to Pentaho customers called Ivy Schema Editor. This is a very simple tool that is very powerful in that you can modify and edit your Mondrian semantic business models right in-line in your browser from the Pentaho User Console … Great job, guys!

ivy2 ivy1

I can now create new models inline and test the model through Analyzer in one place. To me, for anyone building an interactive BI solution with Pentaho, this seems like a must-have tool.

UPDATE: Building Analytical Models in Pentaho

15 Apr

As a quick update to my previous blog post on mechanisms to auto-generate Mondrian cubes using Pentaho, I’ve included a brief 10-minute video on how to modify and enhance the auto-generated models and then publish those back to the Pentaho BA server to share with the rest of your organization as a BI Solution here.

One more update to that post that I want to point out … I specifically called-out a command-line option to call the REST API that will pull out the Mondrian XML schema for your cube and stream it to a text file for advanced editing.

However, in the video I used a browser-based mechanism that works just the same, saving the XML file in my downloads folder. To do this, use a URI such as this: http://localhost:8080/pentaho/plugin/data-access/api/datasource/analysis/foodmart/download. In that URI, change “foodmart” to the name of the schema that you wish to export and edit.

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